Silent revolutions: conviviality

De Leonardo Boff: “With the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and of the socialism that was its counterpoint (independently of its grave internal problems), capitalism ended up occupying all the space in the economy and politics. With Margaret Thatcher’s assumption of power in Great Britain and that of Ronald Reagan in the United States, the capitalist logic acquired free rein: the complete liberalization of the markets with a breakdown of all controls, the introduction of the minimalist state, of privatization and boundless competition.

The so-called, “happy globalization” was not so happy.

Nobel laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz, could write in 2011: «just 1% of the very rich cause the economy and all the planetary functions to benefit their interests» (“Of the 1% by 1%”, Vanity Fair, May 2011). For this reason, one of the biggest multimillionaires, the speculator Warren Buffet boasted: «yes, class struggle exists, but my class, the class of the rich, is the one leading the struggle and we are winning» (CNN 2005 interview).

It so happens that all the rich types failed to include in their calculations the ecological factor, considering the limits of the natural goods and services as worthless externalities. This also occurs in the economic debates in Brazil, which is behind on this issue, with the exception of a few, such as Ladislau Dowbor.

Alongside the global hegemony of the capitalist system, silent revolutions grew everywhere. They are the base groups, scientists and others with an ecological sense who are teaching alternatives to this way of inhabiting planet Earth. If it continues pitilessly stressing the Earth, she could change and provoke an imbalance capable of destroying a great part of our civilization.

In such a dramatic context arose, “The Coexistence” movement, of groups now including more than 3,200 people all over the world (see http://www.lesconvivialistes.org). They seek to live together (hence, coexistence), caring for one another and for nature, not denying conflicts, but making of them factors of dynamism and creativity. Is the politics of the gain-gain.” (cont.)

Leonardo Boff

With the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and of the socialism that was its counterpoint (independently of its grave internal problems), capitalism ended up occupying all the space in the economy and politics. With Margaret Thatcher’s assumption of power in Great Britain and that of Ronald Reagan in the United States, the capitalist logic acquired free rein: the complete liberalization of the markets with a breakdown of all controls, the introduction of the minimalist state, of privatization and boundless competition.

The so-called, “happy globalization” was not so happy.

Nobel laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz, could write in 2011: «just 1% of the very rich cause the economy and all the planetary functions to benefit their interests» (“Of the 1% by 1%”, Vanity Fair, May 2011). For this reason, one of the biggest multimillionaires, the speculator Warren Buffet boasted: «yes, class struggle exists, but my class, the class of the…

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